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“All human beings are born free and equal

in dignity and rights.”

- Universal Declaration of Human Rights


Country Profile

The People’s Republic of China (PRC) is an authoritarian state in which the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) is the paramount authority. CCP members hold almost all top government and security apparatus positions. Ultimate authority rests with the CCP Central Committee’s 25-member Political Bureau (Politburo) and its seven-member Standing Committee.

Repression and coercion of organizations and individuals involved in civil and political rights advocacy as well as in public interest and ethnic minority issues remained severe in 2016. As in previous years, citizens did not have the right to choose their government and elections were restricted to the lowest local levels of governance. Authorities prevented independent candidates from running in those elections, such as delegates to local people’s congresses. Citizens had limited forms of redress against official abuse. Other serious human rights abuses included arbitrary or unlawful deprivation of life, executions without due process, illegal detentions at unofficial holding facilities known as “black jails,” torture and coerced confessions of prisoners, and detention and harassment of journalists, lawyers, writers, bloggers, dissidents, petitioners, and others whose actions the authorities deemed unacceptable. There was also a lack of due process in judicial proceedings, political control of courts and judges, closed trials, the use of administrative detention, failure to protect refugees and asylum seekers, extrajudicial disappearances of citizens, restrictions on nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), discrimination against women, minorities, and persons with disabilities. Authorities used extralegal measures, such as enforced disappearances and strict house arrest, to prevent public expression of critical opinions, and continued to censor and tightly control public discourse on the internet, and in print and other media. There was at least one widely reported extraterritorial disappearance that occurred during the year.

Official repression of the freedoms of speech, religion, movement, association, and assembly of Tibetans in the Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) and other Tibetan areas and of Uighurs in the Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region (XUAR) continued and were more severe than in other areas of the country. In the XUAR officials sometimes subjected individuals engaged in peaceful expression of political and religious views to arbitrary arrest, harassment, and expedited judicial procedures without due process in the name of combatting terrorism.

Authorities prosecuted a number of abuses of power through the court system, particularly with regard to corruption, but in most cases the CCP first investigated and punished officials using opaque internal party disciplinary procedures. The CCP continued to dominate the judiciary and controlled the appointment of all judges and in certain cases directly dictated the court’s ruling. Authorities targeted citizens who promoted independent efforts to combat abuses of power.


Alimujiang Yimiti
Advocate: Rep. Lynn
Jenkins (R-KS)

Gao Zhisheng


Gedhun Choekyi Nyima
The Panchen Lama
Advocate: Rep. Jim
McGovern (D-MA)

Guo Quan
Advocate: Rep. Ted
Poe (R-TX)

Illham Tohti


James Su Zhimin

Kunchok Tsephel


Li Chang


Liu Xia
Under house arrest

Liu Xianbin


Lobsang Tsering
Advocate: Rep. Gerald
Connolly (D-VA)

Wang Bingzhang


Wang Zhiwen
Under house arrest

Zhu Yufu
Advocate: Rep. Randy
Hultgren (R-IL)

Zhang Shaojie
Advocate: Rep. Mark
Meadows (R-NC)